Last edited by Mikashakar
Wednesday, July 22, 2020 | History

1 edition of Field experiment of reverse combustion oil recovery from a Utah tar sand found in the catalog.

Field experiment of reverse combustion oil recovery from a Utah tar sand

Field experiment of reverse combustion oil recovery from a Utah tar sand

  • 295 Want to read
  • 6 Currently reading

Published by Energy Research and Development Administration, Technical Information Center, for sale by the National Technical Information Service in Oak Ridge, Tenn, Springfield, Va .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Oil sands,
  • Secondary recovery of oil

  • Edition Notes

    Statementby C. S. Land ... [et al.]
    ContributionsLand, C S, United States. Energy Research and Development Administration. Technical Information Center
    The Physical Object
    Pagination18 p. :
    Number of Pages18
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL14894975M

    Sydney Tar Ponds [14], whose remediation is an immediate priority for the government of Canada [15]. The technology has also been evaluated, with the support of the government of France, for treating the oil-contaminated sand produced by the previously mentioned shipwreck of .   "If we burn all the tar sand oil, the temperature rise, just from burning that tar sand, will be half of what we've already seen"—an estimated additional nearly .

    Heavy oils. The recovery of heavy crude oils is impeded by a viscous resistance to flow at reservoir temperatures. The heating of heavy crudes markedly improves their mobility and promotes their recovery. Heat may be introduced into the reservoir by injecting a hot fluid, such as steam or hot water, or by burning some of the heavy oil in the reservoir (a process referred . COVID Resources. Reliable information about the coronavirus (COVID) is available from the World Health Organization (current situation, international travel).Numerous and frequently-updated resource results are available from this ’s WebJunction has pulled together information and resources to assist library staff as they consider how to handle .

      In fact, replacing one oil field that produces , barrels a day would require a square-kilometer algae-biofuel field, according to former oil man Dirks—and replacing the world's oil. Oil sands are a mixture of sand, water, heavy oil and other minerals; heavy oil is often classified as bitumen [U.S. EIA, c]. These deposits cannot be tapped with standard production methods (e.g., natural flow into production wells) [Rogner, ] and therefore require more complex and advanced technologies [Chew, ].


Share this book
You might also like
On the complexity analysis of the coriolis and centripetal effects of a 6 DOF robot manipulator

On the complexity analysis of the coriolis and centripetal effects of a 6 DOF robot manipulator

Drinking helps you drive straight

Drinking helps you drive straight

The banking industry in the 1990s: Challenges and prospects

The banking industry in the 1990s: Challenges and prospects

Centennial publication

Centennial publication

American spirit

American spirit

Tenerife & the Western Canary Islands.

Tenerife & the Western Canary Islands.

Evolution of Flightlessness in Rails (Gruiformes: Rallidae): Phylogenetic, Ecomorphological, and Ontogenetic Perspectives (Ornithological Monographs No. 53) (Ornithological Monographs, 53)

Evolution of Flightlessness in Rails (Gruiformes: Rallidae): Phylogenetic, Ecomorphological, and Ontogenetic Perspectives (Ornithological Monographs No. 53) (Ornithological Monographs, 53)

Management of the MMS-LSU Coastal Marine Institute

Management of the MMS-LSU Coastal Marine Institute

Réimpression de larchitecture française

Réimpression de larchitecture française

Introduction to high performance liquid chromatography

Introduction to high performance liquid chromatography

Student organizations and politics

Student organizations and politics

Portland cement industry: supply-demand outlook.

Portland cement industry: supply-demand outlook.

Field experiment of reverse combustion oil recovery from a Utah tar sand Download PDF EPUB FB2

The first reverse combustion field experiment was conducted in late in Utah's Northwest Asphalt Ridge deposit [8]. A nine-well line pattern (Fig. ) was drilled through a section ten feet thick of Upper Cretaceous-Mesaverde tar sand at a depth of feet.

Tar-sand-oil-recovery research at the Laramie Energy Research Center, ERDA, is re­ viewed. The status and current results of an associated field experiment scheduled to start in in the Northwest Asphalt Ridge deposit near Vernal, Utah, to test in-situ oil recovery by reverse combustion.

INTRODUCTION Part of the mission of the EnergyCited by: 7. Get this from a library. Field experiment of reverse combustion oil recovery from a Utah tar sand.

[United States. Energy Research and Development. At °F, the viscosity of these Utah bitumens is about cp. Sulfur content is about weight percent and is only about one-tenth of that found in the Athabasca tar sand.

The first reverse combustion field experiment was conducted in late in Utah's Northwest Asphalt Ridge deposit. Major accomplishments of the report period include the first field experiment using reverse combustion for in-situ oil recovery from tar sand deposits which produced 65 barrels of oil.

Light oils produced were of high quality. In most samples, sulfur and nitrogen content was lower than that of the original bitumen. The primary technical deterent to production of oil from tar sand by in situ processes is the oil's high viscosity and resultant immobility.

In all of the 40 reported in situ oil recovery projects, the viscosity reduction is accomplished by thermal processes – either steam, combustion or : L.C.

Marchant. In Enhanced Recovery Methods for Heavy Oil and Tar Sands, Speight provides the current methods of recovery for heavy oil and tar sand bitumen technology, broken down by thermal and non-thermal methods. An engineer, graduate student or professional working with heavy oil, upcoming and current, will greatly benefit from this much-needed text.

fuels, chapter II production of oil from tar sands: U. Bureau of Mines Open-File Reportp. to CUPPS, C. Q., C. Land, and L.

Marchant,Field experiment of in situ oil recovery from a Utah tar sand by reverse combustion: American Institute of Chemical Engineers Sym­ posium seriesv.

72, p. The average oil recovery by employing in-situ combustion is 50%. The major amount of oil is recovered before breakthrough of the combustion zone.

For heavy oils, about 50% crude oil recovery occurs after breakthrough, whereas low-viscosity oil production declines very rapidly following breakthrough.

Many non-oil producing countries are enriched with other sources of energy, for example tar sand, oil shale, coal, biomass, and uranium, that are not fully utilized. Supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) of tar sand was carried out in a batch autoclave at different temperatures.

result, the oil expands, the viscosity drops and the permeability increases. To ensure success, the process has to be cyclical. This is the principal enhanced oil recovery program in use today. In situ combustion of oil on site or fire flood, works best when the oil saturation and porosity are high.

Introduction to Enhanced Recovery Methods for Heavy Oil and Tar Sands, Second Edition, explores the importance of enhanced oil recovery (EOR) and how it has grown in recent years thanks to the increased need to locate unconventional resources such as heavy oil and unately, petroleum engineers and managers aren't always well-versed in the.

perform a combustion analysis during routine service, or any time changes are made that will affect the combustion process. This can be as simple as adjusting an air shutter, changing gas pressure or as involved as changing an oil nozzle.

A combustion analysis is performed for four primary reasons: 1. Petroleum production - Petroleum production - Recovery of oil and gas: Petroleum reservoirs usually start with a formation pressure high enough to force crude oil into the well and sometimes to the surface through the tubing.

However, since production is invariably accompanied by a decline in reservoir pressure, “primary recovery” through natural drive soon comes to an end.

The oil sands emit about 60 Mt of GHGs per year, representing % of Canada's total emissions and about % of global GHG emissions. About 80% of the GHGs contained in a barrel of oil are emitted by the end user during combustion.

oil can be recovered by a variety of methods such as CO. injection, natural gas miscible injection, and steam recovery in a tertiary or enhanced oil recovery (EOR) phase [1].

Primary recovery: Glover () explained all recovery methods, including primary recovery mechanism as. Heavy Oil and Tar Sand Bitumen 7 reflected in the differences observed in various recovery processes as well as in the price variations between conventional crude oil types, the heavy oils, and tar sand bitumen (Tables and ) (Speight,a, b).

Typically, crude oil quality has an effect on the recovery process insofar as. Cupps, C.Q., at al., "Field Experiment of In-situ Oil Recovery from a Utah Tar Sand by Reverse Combustion." In Oil Shale and Tar Sands, ed. John Smith and Mark Atwood, NY, NY: American Institute of Chemical Engineers,72, (): 62,   Spontaneous combustion or spontaneous ignition, as it is often called, is the occurrence of fire without the application of an external heat source.

Due to chemical, biological, or physical processes, combustible materials self-heat to a. A flow experiment conducted with the same composition produced only single-phase microemulsion leading to 74% recovery of the original oil in place from a synthetic oil sand.

Future experiments will be focused on optimizing the formulation and testing with actual oil. The main advantage of the combustion tube is the estimation of the amount of the fuel and the speed of the combustion front. Summary. In-situ combustion is a method of the crude oil recovery in which the air is injected to the crude oil reservoir to burn the heavy fractions of the crude oil and make heat to ease the production.Four thermal processes (steam displacement, not-gas pyrolysis, reverse and forward combustion) were evaluated to select the most effective oil recovery process for the in situ development of the tar sand resource at Tar Sand Triangle, Utah.

Reverse combustion was not considered an effective process for this deposit because of the low initial.Other articles where Reverse combustion is discussed: heavy oil and tar sand: In situ combustion: of in situ combustion called reverse combustion, a short-term forward burn is initiated by air injection into a well that will eventually produce oil, after which the air injection is switched to adjacent wells.

This process is used for recovering extremely viscous oil that will .